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Bird of the Moment

#582 Restless Flycatcher: 14 June 2017

Some weeks ago I went to Toonpan a dry pasture area outside Townsville which is good for dry country birds such as Bustards and often produces unusual birds. There were a couple of Restless Flycatchers there hawking for insects and I found out later that this species has never featured as bird of the week/moment, an omission we’ll rectify now.

Photo of Restless Flycatcher restless_flycatcher_60354

They are dapper birds, smart in their glossy black and white plumage and long tail. They bare a superficial resemblance to the similarly sized Willie Wagtail, but the species is a member of the Monarch Flycatcher family rather than the Fantails. The nominate larger type inquieta breeds in eastern, southern and southwestern Australia, but not in Tasmania or eastern Western Australia (the Nullabor). The smaller type occurs in northern Australia from northwestern Queensland through the Top End of the Northern Territory to northeastern Western Australia.

Photo of Restless Flycatcher restless_flycatcher_181932

Taxonomists disagree as to whether these types should be treated as conspecific or separate species. I’m treating them as separate ones here, so 'Restless Flycatcher’ refers to the southern one, and ‘Paperbark Flycatcher’ to the northern one. Both are mainly sedentary, but there is some northward movement of the Restless Flycatcher in winter which is when it occurs here in northeastern Queensland.

Photo of Restless Flycatcher restless_flycatcher_181933

Restless Flycatchers have a characteristic hovering flight when hawking for insects and this one at Toonpan was doing just this between me and the afternoon sun in the second, third and fourth photos. There were all taken within an elapsed time of one second and in the third one it is turning away from whatever attracted its attention in the first two. When hawking like this, they make ‘grinding, churring sounds’ (quoting Pizzey and Knight) which are supposed to disturb insects into flight. For this reason, the species is sometimes called the Scissors Grinder.

Photo of Restless Flycatcher restless_flycatcher_181934

The fifth photo shows one of the two birds checking out the vegetation along a barbed wire fence. It’s not, as it might appear, flying towards the fence. Rather it had been perched on the fence seconds before and is making its way down the side of it.

Photo of Restless Flycatcher restless_flycatcher_181958

The Restless Flycatcher builds a beautiful nest of grass, bark and spiders’ webs on a horizontal branch, sixth photo with a usual clutch size of three. The nest is typically decorated or maybe camouflaged with lichen. In this photo you can see the broad, flat bill characteristic of Monarch Flycatchers.

Photo of Restless Flycatcher restless_flycatcher_59552

Restless Flycatchers are usually found near water. The one in the seventh photo is having a drink from a river.

Photo of Restless Flycatcher restless_flycatcher_60351

Here is the Paperbark Flycatcher, eighth photo. The best way I know to separate it from the Restless Flycatcher is by range, though the Paperbark is smaller (17-19cm versus 19-22cm) and supposed to be glossier and have a darker back. The calls are supposed to be slightly different, though they sound much the same to me

Photo of Restless Flycatcher paperbarkflycatcher_93695

The Paperbark Flycatcher also builds a cup-shaped nest on a horizontal branch, ninth photo, but the sources I have don’t mention bark as a building material, or lichen as a decoration. As with the Restless Flycatcher, both genders share in nest-building, incubation and rearing of the chicks.

Photo of Restless Flycatcher paperbarkflycatcher_09219

If we treat Restless and Paperbark as separate species, then the Restless is an Australian endemic, The Paperbark isn’t as it also occurs in southern New Guinea on both sides of the Indonesian-PNG border.

Greetings
Ian

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Page revised on 6 October 2017